Getting the Boot (or Shoe)

My stylish new footwear, fall leaves for time reference.

My stylish new footwear, fall leaves for time reference.

I went to the doctor today and left with one new shoe and a big bag of pity party.  As you know, I sprained my ankle all the way back on May 14th.  I’ve had some big downs and small ups since then, but since it’s been 20 weeks (5 whole months!  3 different seasons!) and I’m still having pain, swelling, and general problems with my foot and ankle, I decided to see another doctor to get it checked out again.

 

Foot bone stuff for fun.

Not my X-rays.

I went to the Hospital for Special Surgery this time and they took comprehensive X-rays of my foot and ankle.  The X-rays didn’t reveal any existing fractures but the doctor did say I had swelling in my 4th metatarsal.  She said that’s a precursor to a stress fracture and it’s what’s been causing me pain at the top of my foot.  She prescribed the beautiful shoe above to keep it stable (which I immediately ordered from Amazon so my germaphobic self can have a second one for indoor wear only), with directions to wear the shoe for 4 weeks, do absolutely no jumping or running, and to generally “take it easy” for 2 weeks.  She said I could do non-impact exercise like the elliptical or biking, but it has to be in the shoe (so let’s be honest, I don’t think I’ll be doing any biking), and if there is any pain I have to stop.  She said my cuboid bone might also be inflamed, but again that rest was the best option.

 

She also prescribed an MRI (that I’ll have to schedule in the next week or so) that will give her a look at the soft tissues.  She’s specifically interested in the scar tissue (she mentioned something about “entrapment” but I’m pretty sure she didn’t mean it in the legal sense) and my cartilage (or what’s left of it!).

 

The doctor did say I could walk, but after wearing this shoe for 30 seconds I see now that she was joking.  This shoe makes it almost impossible to walk.  My current stride makes John Wayne look like a runway model.  They’ve hobbled me while claiming I can walk – it’s like handing someone an empty soda can and telling them to drink as much as they want.  In fact, wearing this shoe makes my ankle hurt even more.  So no, I won’t be walking.  I’ll be here at home sulking and gaining weight and feeling sorry for myself.*  This is how you turn a marathon runner into a diabetic.

 

*Ok, but actually, I’m almost done feeling sorry for myself today.  I ate an entire bag of cookies and complained to my friends, but ultimately it is what it is.  I’m glad it was caught early and didn’t turn into a real fracture.  And I’m hopeful that this plus whatever the MRI will show will lead to treatments that will actually get me back out there running, hopefully before the heat death of the universe.  But yes, 4 weeks in this shoe is 4 more weeks of torture after a torturous 5 months.  Are we done with 2016 yet?

 

Have you ever had to wear an orthopedic boot or shoe?  What stupid series on HBO or Netflix should I watch next?  Is all this pain and time spent off my feet reducing my sentence in purgatory?  Share in the comments!

6 thoughts on “Getting the Boot (or Shoe)

  1. Danilo Torres

    Netflix: Luke Cage. Let me know if its worth it. Also, did you ever get back to Dr. Who? Start with Season 5. Plus you can focus on core exercises while you’re watching. You should have a super strong core by the time you get the boot off!

    Reply
    1. WTFinish Post author

      Thanks for the recommendation! And yes, someone else suggested working on my arms anytime I was frustrated by my legs (which would be all the time – I’d be Arnold by the end of this!). But you’re right, I can definitely incorporate other exercise into my life. I just hate all that other exercise! 😉

      Reply
      1. LunaTek

        It’s like a fun higher-budget history channel re-enactment. It’s about chasing Pablo Escobar. Educational! So it would be more like breaking bad if Gus were real.

        Reply

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